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Classroom Courses

Nurse continuing education courses

Find a course that’s tailored to your professional development below. Refer to each individual course for credit affiliation and contact hour fulfillment.

Effective Management of Fluid Waste in the OR: What You Need to Know

Course Code: 3972 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses

In all surgical practice settings, reducing the risk of infection for patients and occupational exposure to blood and other infectious material for staff members are ongoing concerns today. Exposure to fluid waste can increase the risk for infection and other adverse events for both patients and members of the surgical team. Significant advancements have also been made in the technology of evacuation devices, including suctioning systems that effectively remove hazardous fluid. Therefore, all members of the perioperative team should be aware of the risks associated with exposure to blood and body fluids in the operating room (OR) and the need to implement measures to effectively evacuate them to provide a safe environment of care for both patients and staff. Fluid waste evacuation equipment can facilitate safety only if it is set up correctly, functioning properly, and used appropriately. This continuing education activity will provide fundamental information related to the hazards associated with occupational exposure to blood and other potentially infectious fluids and the importance of its proper handling and disposal. The various types of medical waste produced by health care facilities will be reviewed. Current collection and disposal methods for fluid waste will be outlined, followed by a discussion of the hazards associated with occupational exposure to blood, body fluids, and other potentially hazardous materials. Finally, current regulations, guidelines, and recommendations related to proper handling of fluid waste will be discussed.

Effective Team: From Diversity to Collective Teamwork

Course Code: 3922 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses
  • Sterile Processing Personnel

Perioperative team members work in a fast-paced, demanding environment where they need to be flexible and ready to anticipate new challenges at any time. The composition of the team can vary from those who provide direct care in the operating room (OR), to those who provide direct care in the preoperative or postanesthesia care units, to those providing direct care for “on call” shifts, as well as those who provide support for the direct caregivers by processing and packaging instruments in the sterile processing area or present instructions for use for new equipment or technologies. Relationships and communications can breakdown under stressful circumstances. This continuing education activity will provide a brief review of how people who work in teams can increase their effectiveness by incorporating useful strategies into their daily experiences. An overview of group dynamics that team members often experience as they work together will be discussed. The factors that contribute to diversity in teams will be presented. Examples of strategies that can be used to enhance teamwork will also be discussed.

Powered Instruments and Caregiver Safety

Course Code: 3567 / classroom
  • 3 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses
  • Sterile Processing Personnel

As the practice of surgery continues to evolve, so do the type and complexity of the surgical instrumentation; powered surgical equipment is one example of the sophisticated instrumentation needed to support advanced surgical techniques. The proper use of the various types of powered surgical instruments available today in order to promote patient safety and prevent postoperative infections is the shared responsibility of many, including central service personnel, biomedical technologists, and all members of the surgical team. Therefore, it is important that perioperative personnel who participate in orthopaedic procedures understand how the proper use of battery powered and electrical surgical instruments promote positive patient outcomes. This educational activity will provide a review of the historical evolution of powered surgical equipment. The component parts basic to the various types of powered surgical instruments and equipment will be presented. Recent safety issues associated with lithium ion batteries will be reviewed. The clinical considerations related to bone sensitivity to heat; key aspects of cutting, sawing, drilling, rasping, and pin driving; as well as blade and bur characteristics associated with the use of powered surgical instruments will be discussed. Finally, general guidelines and additional considerations for the safe use and handling of powered surgical instruments, including the importance of original equipment manufacturer (OEM) service contracts, reuse, and reprocessing aspects of accessories will be outlined.

Preventing Drug Diversion in Healthcare

Course Code: 4120 / classroom

2 contact hours
Perioperative Nurses

 

 

 

 

Opioid addiction has been recognized as an epidemic in the United States. Healthcare professionals are not immune to this risk; in fact, the ready access to prescription drugs in the healthcare setting has been recognized as a key factor in substance abuse among healthcare professionals and drug diversion in the healthcare setting at the hands of addicted healthcare professionals. Greater awareness and education about drug diversion is needed in the healthcare setting, including what it is, how it occurs, and how it can be prevented. The education efforts should also create an understanding of adjunct technologies that can be implemented to reduce drug diversion dangers in healthcare and help organizations come into compliance with federal and state regulations for safe drug disposal.

 

Smoke Evacuation: A Review of the Standards

Course Code: 4192 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses
  • Sterile Processing Personnel

Surgical smoke is ubiquitous in the surgical setting, generated by commonly used surgical instruments such as electrocautery devices. Research suggests the surgical smoke plume released into the air can transmit harmful biologic and toxic particles, which can be inhaled by all members of the surgical team, as well as by patients. Standards for smoke evacuation have been established internationally to protect patients and providers from the harmful effects of surgical smoke; however, smoke evacuation compliance varies across surgical settings. Through regulatory and accreditation compliance standards and developing legislation, stricter rules are on the horizon for surgical smoke evacuation. Professional associations, surgical teams and technology developers provide examples of smart strategies for achieving safe and effective surgical smoke evacuation. Perioperative professionals working in all care areas, including the operating room, sterile processing and materials management should be familiar with these standards to support clear air across the care environment.

Smoke Evacuation / Dangers of Smoke Plume

Course Code: 3566 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses

Surgical smoke plume is pervasive in the daily lives of all healthcare workers in the operating room (OR) practice setting. This continuing education activity will provide a review of the dangers of exposure to surgical smoke plume as well as effective strategies to minimize this exposure in the OR. The contents of and hazards associated with surgical smoke plume will be reviewed. Current regulations, guidelines, and recommended practices related to evacuation of surgical smoke will be outlined, focusing on risk reduction strategies. The various types of smoke evacuation systems available today will be described, including the key criteria in the evaluation and section of a smoke evacuation system. Finally, the clinical implications of failure to comply with surgical smoke evacuation guidelines will be discussed, followed by a list of tools to facilitate compliance.

Smoke Evacuation: Selecting The Right Tools, Understanding New Technologies

Course Code: 4193 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses
  • Sterile Processing Personnel

When an organization realizes the hazards of surgical smoke and makes the decision to implement surgical smoke evacuation to protect staff and patients, the next step is choosing smoke evacuation technologies that provide the best fit. A structured approach to surgical smoke evacuation product evaluation and selection should address key use considerations, such as open versus closed procedures, setting, cost and best practices for each smoke evacuation product type. Assembly, use and maintenance considerations according to manufacturer instructions for use should be included in this product evaluation and selection process. Approaches for standardized implementation and compliance with using the selected technologies should also be addressed. By understanding the wide range of products available to evacuate surgical smoke and comparing product qualities to organizational needs, the most appropriate surgical smoke evacuation technologies can be implemented to provide optimal protection from the dangers of surgical smoke.

Surgical Tourniquets: Clinical Considerations and Strategies for Safe Care

Course Code: 3642 / classroom

2 contact hours

Perioperative Nurses

Surgical tourniquets are used frequently in operative procedures on the extremities to control bleeding and optimize visualization. If used properly, surgical tourniquets are safe and invaluable tools, as they facilitate improved patient outcomes by reducing blood loss as well as operating time. However, the incorrect use of these devices is associated with potential complications and preventable damage due to various factors such as over-pressurization and prolonged inflation time. This continuing education activity will present an overview of the potential problems and complications associated with the use of surgical tourniquets. It will include a discussion of professional practice guidelines for the safe use of surgical tourniquets, including the determination of patient-specific arterial occlusion pressure. The key considerations of pneumatic tourniquet system components, including the various types of cuffs available today, as they relate to patient safety will be reviewed.

Waging War on Cross Contamination with PPE and Surgical Helmet Systems

Course Code: 3908 / classroom

2 contact hours
Perioperative Nurses

Working in the Operating Room (OR) requires highly skilled staff members to coordinate and deliver the care necessary to surgically treat a wide variety of patients. The OR staff works in an intense, fast-paced, rapidly changing and technically advanced health care environment to safely perform surgical procedures. This rapidly changing environment presents continual challenges in the form of newly recognized pathogens and microorganisms that have become resistant to current treatment modalities and can greatly affect patient and worker safety. In the perioperative setting, good infection prevention and control is essential to ensure that patients who undergo any surgical procedure receive safe and effective care. Protecting patients and healthcare practitioners from potentially infectious agent transmission is a primary focus of perioperative registered nurses in the OR. There are many ways to achieve the goal of protection from infection transmission. This continuing education activity examines the role of personal protective equipment (PPE) and specifically surgical helmet systems in achieving patient and health care (HC) worker safety and lowering infection transmission and cross contamination through successful implementation of best practices based upon current recommendations and guidelines.

When It Counts: Validating No Sponge Left Behind

Course Code: 3835 / classroom
  • 2 contact hours
  • Perioperative Nurses

A responsibility of the perioperative registered nurse is to keep all surgical patients free from injury due to extraneous objects, including surgical sponges and towels. While perioperative nurses and other members of the surgical team sign off “the final count is correct” on a daily basis, current evidence consistently identifies incidence of retained surgical items (RSIs) despite reports of a correct sponge count. Retained surgical items continue to have serious clinical, economic, and legal ramifications creating a call to action to rectify practices prone to error. Today, several considerations, including rising malpractice costs, new federal payment penalties, new quality frameworks, patient safety report cards, as well as heightened public awareness, may be leaving health care providers with little choice but to act effectively to prevent the occurrence of RSIs. An overwhelming amount of clinical evidence shows that manual counting of sponges – even when carried out under evidence-based guidelines – often fails due to human error and other factors and therefore is unreliable when used as the primary mechanism to avoid RSIs. Little has changed for perioperative nurses in their “mission critical” job of counting until adjunct technologies became available in 2006.

Today, these technologies provide useful tools to supplement the manual counting process to not only achieve accurate counts, but validate them as well, thereby providing the path to zero RSIs. The purpose of this continuing education activity is to provide information that will support all members of the surgical team in providing a safer surgical experience through enhanced awareness of the technologies available to prevent RSIs and validate manual sponge counts. The incidence of RSI and the impact on patient outcomes, including the Sentinel Event Alert issued by The Joint Commission in October 2013, will be discussed. The economic implications, including the impact of federal payment reforms and other initiatives that are part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will be explored. The legal ramifications for perioperative personnel will be outlined. The problems associated with manual count procedures, including the impact of incorrect or failed counts, will be described. Finally, the various adjunct technologies available today, with a focus on a system that can document and validate manual counts, will be reviewed.

 

  • “My customers who attended the SSA in Pittsburgh are raving about it. A few of them said they attend “many AORN events” and this one was first class, and very educational!

    Thought you’d like to hear that! Thanks for putting this together.”

    Stryker Sales Rep, Pennsylvania

  • “I wanted to thank everyone for their assistance with the Vicksburg Middle School Science Night. It was a huge success. Both kids and parents said we were the best presentation (and most crowded) of the evening. This is saying a lot when there was a live alligator for the kids to hold.”

  • “On behalf of the midtown OR staff this presentation is phenomenal. It really enriched our knowledge about suction and its entities. Thank you and we look forward for another one next year.”
    Ruby, RN

  • “I wanted to thank you for inviting me to the education program with Stryker. It was quality education and I look forward to attending next year. Thank you.”
    Donna, RN, BSN, MSM, CNOR

Pfiedler Enterprises –

Stryker’s Learn Program is a portal which provides information regarding continuing education programs supported and funded by Stryker. Pfiedler Enterprises is the educational provider and is the fully responsible entity. If you have any questions related to continuing education, contact hours, and certificates, please contact Pfiedler directly at registrar@pfiedlerenterprises.com or (720) 748-6144.